The Pastoral or Rabbinical office in the modern day congregation is not biblical.

But be not ye called Rabbi: for one is your Master, even Christ; and all ye are brethren. And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven. Neither be ye called masters: for one is your Master, even Christ. But he that is greatest among you shall be your servant. And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted.
Matthew 23:8-12

The role of Pastor among the early Ekklesia is quite different than the office of the head Pastor in the modern “churches” today. Unlike the body in most churches of today, the early Ekklesia were a participatory body.

We are not told in scripture that it is the pastor who will teach us, but rather the anointing of Messiah.

“But the anointing which ye have received of him abideth in you, and ye need not that any man teach you: but as the same anointing teacheth you of all things, and is truth, and is no lie, and even as it hath taught you, ye shall abide in him.”
1 JOhn 2:27

“Neither be ye called masters: for one is your Master, even Christ. But he that is greatest among you shall be your servant.”

The lead Pastor/Rabbi is a fundamental figure within the “church or modern day synagogue” who is met with praise, accolades, and reliance upon to deliver the Word of Elohim to the congregation. Most often, he is on the top of the hierarchical ladder, or status as the main focal figure to render out theological interpretations within the “church.” He is often trained and graduated with a degree from a seminary or other school who has met the criteria, or qualifications to maintain their position as a professional.

The dichotomy between what is “sacred” and what is “worldly” is a pagan conception and not the mindset of the Ekklesia. In the Kingdom of Elohim, ordained spiritual elitism has no foundation since every believer has the discernment from God to recognize those who have particular giftings that God has given them. Among the early Ekklesia, the word “ordain” did not mean to be put into an official title, but rather it was an affirmation of the gifting and character of an individual that is recognized.

The office of Pastor or Rabbi is commonly a magnet for Narcissistic types who view the role as the “head of the church.” Scripturally, the word Pastor is used in plural form. What this means is, there is no Scriptural evidence that there was a singular senior head pastoral practice among the early Ekklesia. Pastor, as many know, is the Latin word for shepherd, and the Greek word for pastors is rendered as poimenas, which also means shepherds. Therefore, a pastor is not a professional title, but a metaphor for one of the various functions of the Ekklesia. A shepherd is a person who cares for and nurtures the people of Elohim, but not within the context of a professional hierarchical title.

But there remained two of the men in the camp, the name of the one was Eldad, and the name of the other Medad: and the spirit rested upon them; and they were of them that were written, but went not out unto the tabernacle: and they prophesied in the camp. And there ran a young man, and told Moses, and said, Eldad and Medad do prophesy in the camp. And Joshua the son of Nun, the servant of Moses, one of his young men, answered and said, My lord Moses, forbid them. And Moses said unto him, Enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the LORD’S people were prophets, and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them!
Numbers 11:26-29

This passage gives an example of Moses opposing hierarchical or “special” positions that would suppress all of God’s people from using their giftings to the specially qualified.

I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not. Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church.
3 John 1:9,10

The Pastoral office as defined in our western world is not the Biblical model, but rather man made which is a distortion of gifting. The Ekklesia were lead only by Messiah where his body is recognized by men who were all of equal standing. Everyone in the body was recognized by their spiritual maturity and not by their hierarchical elitism.

We can trace the deviation from the biblical Pastoral office back to Ignatius of Antioch (AD 35-107) and the role of the Bishop. The Bishop required absolute obedience in the “church and was given complete authority.

The ordination into an office originates from pagan rites by empowering an individual through divine streams to become venerable, honorable, and separated. It is the syncretism of Old Testament priesthood with Greek hierarchy. In contrast, every person who was part of the early Ekklesia set not themselves higher than one another, but in humility served each another. This is the model in scripture that Yeshua gave us.

Only Messiah has the preeminence in his body!

I think it is the construct of our day where the goats are elevated over the laity even though Messiah taught contrary to this and told us he alone is our Rabbi and we are all brethren. Many of these goats scatter the flock. There are so many congregational “leaders” who fail to see that we are called to servanthood, not to be leaders. Messiah and the Holy Spirit are the leaders and we need no man to teach us because of that. Even though it is still good to hear sermon’s, there are many who have taken the preeminence even though scripture condemns this practice and these false leaders disobey Messiah.

I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.
3 John 1:9

Only messiah has the preeminence: And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.
Colossians 1:18